Borjomi, Kukushka and 1001 Raindrops

Borjomi
Borjomi is famous of its water. I didn’t expect getting completely soaked though. Back in May I went for a training to Bakuriani, a popular Georgian skiing resort. Well, May obviously isn’t a high peak season for winter sports but I was hoping I could do a bit of hiking and just spend some nice, quality time in the nature. I didn’t. It rained. It rained cats and dogs. It drizzled rain. It poured. I was soaked, cold and I sort of resigned to the fact I wouldn’t see too much during the training days. The schedule was pretty packed anyway.
Bakuriani, Georgia

But well, after several days in our hotel complex we grow bored. We took a risk and got out the safe and dry resort space to head off to Borjomi. We hopped on Kukushka, the narrow-gauge train aka the slowest train I’ve ever taken. The construction of the Borjomi-Bakuriani railroad begun in 1897 and lasted four years. The first Kukushka train hit the rails in 1902. It’s been serving tourists and fans of winter sports ever since. The distance between the two towns is just 17 kilometres. Kukushka takes her time though.The journey lasts cca 2 hours. It’s long but it’s worth it, especially if you have to embrace the rain, the clouds and the grey skies. The train is so slow that it’s actually possible to take pictures while on the road. Some of them won’t even be blurry. I kept shooting. And I watched Georgian countryside passing by. It so lovely, green and different from what you typically think of when someone says “Georgia”.
Bakuriani, Georgia
Bakuriani, Georgia
view from Kukushka train
Bakuriani, Georgia
Two hours later I was in Borjomi. Guess what, it was raining. Borjomi stood there patiently though, waiting for us to take a stroll. I didn’t have a raincoat so I was using a completely hideous blue trash bag as a cover. Glad no one captured this.
Borjomi, Georgia
Borjomi
So, Borjomi. This little, peaceful town was tremendously famous throughout the former Eastern bloc for its salty carbonated mineral water. The spa town dates back to 19th century when the springs and the water’s benefits to health were discovered. The town lies at the foot of the hill, surrounded by beautiful, thick forests. It’s pretty, it’s calm and it’s boring. So boring. If someone is more lucky with the weather than I was, hiking in Borjomi-Kharagauli National Park might probably make the stay more entertaining. We couldn’t walk any further than to a city park stretched along the Borjomula river. We saw a water spring and a lot of quirkiness. The first one was planned, the second surprised me. Take a look at the photos.
Borjomi
Borjomi
Borjomi, Georgia
Borjomi
Borjomi, Georgia
Borjomi, Georgia
Borjomi, Georgia
Borjomi
Borjomi
Have you ever been to Borjomi? Would you like to go? Which picture is your favorite?

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